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Why Study Music?

Why Study Music?
 
The arts is one of six basic academic areas students should study for college success, according to the College Board.

From: Academic Preparation for College: What Students Need to Know and Be Able to Do, 1983 [still in use], The College Board, New York.
Available here: MENC - Benefits of Music Education Brochure, Spring 2002


Children from "arts-rich" public schools score higher on expression, risk-taking, creativity-imagination, cooperative learning, and academic self-concept than children in "arts poor" systems.

From: "Learning In and Through the Arts: The Question of Transfer," Judith M. Burton, Robert Horowitz, and Hal Abeles, Studies in Art Education, 2000, 41(3): 228-257
Available here: The Arts Education Partnership - Critical Links: Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development


An extensive study of over 25,000 eighth to tenth grade students found that students involved in the arts earn better grades and perform better on standardized tests than non-arts students. The study also found that high school arts students are less likely to drop out of school, have a more positive self-concept, perform more community service, watch fewer hours of television, and report less boredom in school.

From: "Involvement in the Arts and Success in Secondary School," James S. Catterall, Americans for the Arts Monographs, 1998, 1 (9), Washington, D.C.
Available here: The Arts Education Partnership - Critical Links: Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development

 
A 1997 study done by Bredekamp and Copple found that children involved in quality music programs had an increased sense of self-esteem.

From: "Self-Esteem: A Byproduct of Quality Classroom Music," by Laverne Warner. Childhood Education, Volume 76, Issue 1, page 19; Copyright 1999.
Available here: Questia Online Library


Quality music programs help children develop their gross- and fine-motor skills, which are important to emotional expression, particularly in children with limited verbal/oral ability.

From: "Self-Esteem: A Byproduct of Quality Classroom Music," by Laverne Warner. Childhood Education, Volume 76, Issue 1, page 19; Copyright 1999.
Available here: Questia Online Library


Early childhood curriculums that integrate a structured music program can help children: develop and understand verbal and musical language, express feelings and emotions in a creative manner, and work well with others.

From: "Self-Esteem: A Byproduct of Quality Classroom Music," by Laverne Warner. Childhood Education, Volume 76, Issue 1, page 19; Copyright 1999.
Available here: Questia Online Library


A study done by Bredekamp and Copple in 1997 found that children need daily musical activities to help with expressing ideas and feelings.

From: "Self-Esteem: A Byproduct of Quality Classroom Music," by Laverne Warner. Childhood Education, Volume 76, Issue 1, page 19; Copyright 1999.
Available here: Questia Online Library


Music helps children gain musical intelligence, vocabulary, an understanding of symbols and sequence, and an increase in memory and auditory function.

From: "Self-Esteem: A Byproduct of Quality Classroom Music," by Laverne Warner. Childhood Education, Volume 76, Issue 1, page 19; Copyright 1999.
Available here: Questia Online Library
Mt. Olive Board of Education
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Flanders, New Jersey 07836
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